Rabbi's Message: New Growth

Rabbi's Message: New Growth

There are four new years in the Jewish calendar, one of which occurs this month. The 15th of Shevat (corresponding in 2019 to Jan 20-21) is the new year for the trees, which was used to calculate tithing for their fruit. There is the 1st of Nisan, which evokes the exodus from Egypt, and is actually the "first" month of the year.  There is the 1st of Elul, used to calculate tithing for cattle. And of course the 1st of Tishrei is "Rosh Hashanah," which traditionally marks the birthday of the world.

Rabbi's Message: Coming Together

Rabbi's Message: Coming Together

People are sad. Some are tired or scared or anxious. Many of us are looking for hope and recognizing that there are no easy answers.

 What we do have is each other. And the opportunity to come together this Shabbat, and in the days, weeks, and months ahead, to recommit to being a congregation, a community, and a country that does not lose hope, that is dedicated to fighting fear and hate, and that will bend the moral arc of the universe towards justice.

Rabbi's Message: Voting

Rabbi's Message: Voting

Our next Jewish holiday falls on Tuesday, November 6.

In Judaism we believe that dina malchuta dina, that the law of a secular government still governs our lives. However, for much of Jewish history, Jews were unable to vote for their secular leaders, and could hardly imagine the privilege of being able to do so today. That historical narrative alone makes Election Day worthy of holiday status. We were in peril, and now we are free. Sound familiar?

Rabbi Silverman's 2018 Rosh Hashanah Day 2 Speech

Rabbi Silverman's 2018 Rosh Hashanah Day 2 Speech

Artistic representations of the Akeidah, Genesis 22:1-19, number in the thousands. And although the binding of Isaac is perhaps not so frequently highlighted in children’s bible books, it is discussed in countless literary works.  Of course, this in part reflects the deep significance this story holds in not just the Jewish, but in the Muslim and Christian traditions. In the Quran, it is told with Ishmael, rather than Isaac, as the son God chooses for the sacrifice.  And of course in Christian tradition the story is a foreshadowing of the sacrifice of Jesus.